women

Save Your Life With Cancer Screening (Part 4)

- 7 Kinds Of Fruit That Pregnant Women Shouldn’t Eat
- How to have natural miscarriage
- Foods That Cause Miscarriage
- Signs Proving You Have Boy Pregnancy

Bladder cancer

Most people don’t need to be screened unless they are at high risk, because it has no tproved to be effective, and most cancers found without screening are curable

Most people don’t need to be screened unless they are at high risk, because it has no tproved to be effective, and most cancers found without screening are curable

·         Rating

2/5 for adults of all ages

·         What’s involved

A test to check for blood or cancer cells in urine.

·         Who needs it

Most people don’t need to be screened unless they are at high risk, because it has no tproved to be effective, and most cancers found without screening are curable

·         Risk factors

Smoking a  family history of the disease, and exposure to workplace chemicals.

Lung cancer

Most don’t need the test unless they are at the highest risk, because the cancer is uncommon in nonsmokers and the test is not very accurate

Most don’t need the test unless they are at the highest risk, because the cancer is uncommon in nonsmokers and the test is not very accurate

·         Rating

2/5 for adults of all ages

·         What’s involved.

A low-dose CT scan.

·         Who needs it

Most don’t need the test unless they are at the highest risk, because the cancer is uncommon in nonsmokers and the test is not very accurate

·         Risk factors

Smoking, a family history of the disease, and long-term exposure to radon, asbestos, or arsenic.

Skin cancer

 
See a doctor if you notice suspicious changes in the color, size, shape, or number of moles.

See a doctor if you notice suspicious changes in the color, size, shape, or number of moles.

·         Rating

2/5 for adults of all ages

·         What’s involved

A visual exam of your skin by a physician looking especially for signs of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

·         Who needs it

Most adults don’t need the exam unless they are at high risk, because the effectiveness of screening has not been proved. But see a doctor if you notice suspicious changes in the color, size, shape, or number of moles.

·         Risk factors

A family history of melanoma, a personal history of frequent sunburns, a large or increasing number of precancerous moles, and being fair-skinned or heavily freckled.

Oral cancer

 
Keep away from risk factors: Smoking, chewing tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption…

Keep away from risk factors: Smoking, chewing tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption…

·         Rating

2/5 for adults of all ages

·         What’s involved

A visual exam of the mouth by a dentist or other health-care provider.

·         Who needs it

Most people don’t need the test unless they are at high risk, because the cancer is relatively uncommon.

·         Risk factors

Smoking, chewing tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption, HPV infection, and weakened immunity from medication, disease, or certain other causes.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer

·         Ratings

2/5 for men age 50 to 74

1/5 for men of all other ages

·         What’s involved

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

·         Who needs it

Men age 50 to 74 should all with a doctor to see whether the benefits of the test outweigh the harm for them based on their risk factors older men rarely need the test because the cancer typically progresses so slowly that treatment does not improve survival. Younger men should consider testing only if they are at high risk, because the cancer is uncommon before age 50.

·         Risk factors

A family history of the disease, being African-American, and smoking.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer

·         Ratings

1/5 for women of all ages

·         What’s involved

A transvaginal ultrasound or the CA-125 blood test, which measures a protein possibly associated with ovarian cancer.

·         Who needs it

Women don’t need to be tested unless they are at high risk, because neither test is likely to detect the disease at a curable stage.

·         Risk factors

A family history of ovarian, breast, or colon cancers, and possibly use of estrogen after menopause for more than five years

Pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer

·         Rating

1/5 for adults of all ages

·         What’s involved

Genetic tests or imaging test of the abdomen

·         Who needs it

People don’t need to be tested unless they are at high risk, because no test is likely to detect the disease at a curable stage.

·         Risk factors

A family history of the disease, smoking, obesity, and possibly type 2 diabetes.

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer

·         Rating

1/5 for men of all ages

·         What’s involved

A physical exam of a man’s testicles by a health-care professional.

·         Who needs it

Men don’t’ need to be tested unless they are at high risk, because most cancers found without screening are curable.

·         Risk factors

A family history, an undescended testicle, or HIV infection.

Colon-cancer screening: just do it

Of the estimated 52,000 people who died of colorectal cancer last year, screening could have saved more than half, according to the American Cancer Society. Yet around 40 percent of people 50 and older don’t get recommended screening tests

Not surprising, our readers, who tend to be a health-savvy bunch, do better than that, according to a survey of more than 10,000 subscribers 50 and older conducted by Consumer Reports National Research Center. Eighty percent of them had been screened for colon cancer in the last five years. But our survey also found worrisome gaps in their knowledge of the tests used.

 
Success Story: For Tracy Doss, colon-cancer screening allowed doctors to detect and remove precancerous growths.

Success Story: For Tracy Doss, colon-cancer screening allowed doctors to detect and remove precancerous growths.

For example, less than half of them were told what the test was looking for, about a third weren’t told of potential complications and a quarter weren’t told what would happen if the tests had abnormal results. Only 10 percent of people who had colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, invasive forms of testing that use a scope to inspect the colon, were told there was a simpler option. And only 55 percent were told of the main risk of the procedures, a perforated colon.

Las, some patients got tests that are not proved effective, including fecal DNA tests and CT colonography (also called virtual colonoscopy). That’s unfortunate, because there are a number of good colon-cancer tests to choose from. The chart below shows the pros and cons of each.

Test

How it works

Cost

Advantages

Disadvantages

Colonoscopy

Every 10 years; starting at age 50. Sooner or more often for some high-risk people or if result are abnormal.

Long, flexible scope is passed through the rectum and entire colon to look for polyps and tumors.

$1,120

Allows immediate removal of polyps and biopsies; shows entire colon; needs to be done just once a decade for most

Risk of bowel infection, perforated bowel, and other complications; requires full-day preparation with laxatives and dietary restriction; sedation required; full-day recovery likely.

Flexible sigmoidoscopy
every five years, with stool test (below) every three years.

Short, flexible scope is inserted into the lower colon to look for polyps and tumors.

$740

No sedation required; can return to work same day; simpler bowel preparation than for colonoscopy; fewer complications than for colonoscopy

Colonoscopy required if positive; shows only the lower third of the colon, so not as thorough as colonoscopy

Stool testing (immunochemical or guaiac-based) Every year.

Detects traces of blood in stool from tumors and polyps that tend to bleed

$5 to $25

Noninvasive; lowest risk of complications; samples are taken at home.

Colonoscopy required if positive; can’t detect most polyps; requires yearly testing; some people might find the test unpleasant.

Risks and benefits of two tests

The data below show that the risks of prostate-cancer screening probably outweigh the benefits and that the benefits of breast-cancer screening are smaller than many women may suspect.

Prostate cancer

Screening 1,000 men every open to four years from age 55 to 69 results in:

·         0 to 1 prostate-cancer deaths prevented

·         3 serious complications caused by treating the cancer, including death, heart attacks, and blood clots in the legs or lungs

·         40 men becoming impotent or incontinent from treatment complications

Breast cancer

Screening 1,000 women every two years from age 50 to 69 results in:

·         5 breast-cancer deaths prevented

·         780 false-positive results

·         55 unneeded biopsies

An unknown number of complications from breast-cancer treatment, including infection, nausea, and exposure to radiation, which may itself cause cancer. Starting screening at age 40 instead of 50 will prevent one additional death but cause an additional 470 false positives and an additional 33 unneeded biopsies

Top search
women
- 6 Ways To Have a Natural Miscarriage
- Foods That Cause Miscarriage
- Losing Weight In A Week With Honey
- Can You Eat Crab Meat During Pregnancy?
- Grape Is Pregnant Women’s Friend
- 4 Kinds Of Fruit That Can Increase Risk Of Miscarriage
- Some Drinks Pregnant Women Should Say No With
- Signs Proving You Have Boy Pregnancy
- Why Do Pregnant Women Have Stomachache When Eating?
- Top Foods That Pregnant Women Should Be Careful Of
- 6 Kinds Of Vegetable That Increase Risk Of Miscarriage
Other
women
- Boost Your Metabolism : Watching Your Weight (part 2)
- Boost Your Metabolism : Watching Your Weight (part 1)
- Too Much Of A Good Thing?
- Banana Is Good For Pregnant Women (Part 2)
- Banana Is Good For Pregnant Women (Part 1)
- Reduce Stress : Get a Massage (part 2)
- Reduce Stress : Get a Massage (part 1)
- How To Practice If You Have Arrhythmia
- Mistakes In Dental Hygiene
- 10 Silent Signs Of Stress
 
Youtube channel
women
Top keywords
women
Miscarriage Pregnant Pregnancy Pregnancy day by day Pregnancy week by week Losing Weight Stress Placenta Makeup Collection
Women
Top 5
women
- Cinnamon: A natural treatment for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?
- 5 Tips for Safe Exercise During Pregnancy
- Four Natural Ways Alternative Medicine Can Help You Get Pregnant (part 2)
- Four Natural Ways Alternative Medicine Can Help You Get Pregnant (part 1)
- Is Your Mental Health Causing You to Gain Weight (part 2) - Bipolar Disorder Associated with Weight Gain