travel

9.    Henry Moore Walk

Hertfordshire

Step into the mind of an abstract sculptor

Description: Step into the mind of an abstract sculptor

Step into the mind of an abstract sculptor

Henry Moore is known for his semi-abstract bronze sculptures that are dotted around the world. The majority of his work features human figures, usually female or mother-and-child, and has attracted a huge following since his display at Tate Britain in 2012. The Henry Moore Foundation is tucked away in Moore’s former home Hoglands in Much Hadham, and includes over 70 acres of gardens displaying his monumental sculptures. This walk takes you through these mystical grounds.

Sound of woodperckers

In Munch Hadham, face the Post Office and turn right along the main street then left at the church Cross over Malting Lane and take the path directly opposite. Bear right at the lane and turn off right into Sidehill Wood. Follow the edge of the woodland and listen for woodpeckers.

Description: Follow the edge of the woodland and listen for woodpeckers.

Follow the edge of the woodland and listen for woodpeckers.

Follow the bridleway passing several small lakes and woods carpeted in bluebells. Just before the bridleway reaches Bourne Lane, take a path left uphill through kissing gates. Follow marker posts to another kissing gat.

An abstract world

Follow the right boundary fence passing a striking reclining figure. Continue to reach a track, turn right and pass farm buildings on the left. Continue into the Henry Moore Foundation grounds. Look out for a reclining figure to your right and the Large Figure in a shelter sculpture to your left. Follow signs through the grounds-you’ll see some mother and child forms and the double oval symbolizing peace and harmony.

Description: Continue into the Henry Moore Foundation grounds.

Continue into the Henry Moore Foundation grounds.

Exit onto a lane at Perry Green. To your right is the Hoops Inn, a 19th-century pub. Take the footpath across the green to the right of the visitor centre. Follow the left hand ditch until you reach a farm track. Follow a further ditch until you reach a broad path. Keep ahead and turn left on another path. Continue until you reach a road.

Back to Much Hadham

This is Green Tye and nearby is The Prince of Wales, another 19th-century pub. Turn left along the road for 300 yards and go right on a bridleway. Bear left at a fork and then right downhill. Turn left into the field and follow signposts into woodland. Look out for red kites and bluebells.

Description: Back to Much Hadham

Back to Much Hadham

At the bottom, follow the path to the left and cross and footbridge to a lane. Turn left along the lane and at a junction go right to reach a ford. Cross the footbridge and turn left along Malting Lane to return to our previous route.

10. Market town

Lowry’s Berwick upon Tweed

Northumberland

Laurence Stephen Lowry visited Berwick-upon-Tweed several times from 1935 and his paintings of the town form an unexpectedly sizeable part of his oeuvre. In Lowry’s time, Berwick was more industrial and more like his native Lancashire than today; now it is a miniature Chester or York in waiting, with its fascinating nooks and crannies. No British city has a more dramatic arrival by train, across the breathtaking, 28-arch viaduct of the Royal Border Bridge, Spanned by two further smaller bridges, the town accompanies the river, tumbling downhill to the sea through broad cobbled streets and alleyways.

Description: Lowry’s Berwick upon Tweed

Lowry’s Berwick upon Tweed

Matchstalk figures

The best way to see how Lowry passed his time in Berwick is to follow the Lowry Trail. In an Imaginative touch, the trail is supported by 18 prints of Lowry’s pictures in situ, overlooking places that he depicted, such as the narrow alley of Sally Port, graceful Palace Street or The Stanks, where he painted a football match staged in a dry moat. You can’t help noticing that Lowry wasn’t above indulging in the odd piece of artistic licence – adding a chimney here, a curious inland islet there – but what is really striking is just how unchanged the scenes he depicted have remained.

Make time, as Lowry did, to visit Berwick’s beaches. Low tide reveals rock pools, but Lowry’s picture remind you just how far north you are: most of his seaside figures remain buttoned up with coats and jumpers, even in sunshine.

Elizabethan walls

Just three miles from the Scottish border, Berwick has been English since 1482, but changed hands at least 13 times before that, which explains the Elizabethan walls hewn from local sandstone. The rest of the town is sealed up by a medieval wall, making Berwick the only completely walled town in Britain. It’s an easy walk around the walls, taking in sensational vantage points, such as Meg’s Mount, looking north to the Lammermuir Hills, southwest to the cheviots, but most stirringly of all, down the coast to Lindisfarne, and Bamburgh Castle, 25 miles as the oystercatcher flies.

Description: Elizabethan walls hewn from local sandstone

Elizabethan walls hewn from local sandstone

Berwick’s cobbled, steep streets boast evocative names such as Foul Ford and Easter Wynd. The place to head for though is Bridge Street, a sleepy, eclectic lane awaiting discovery by the world’s guidebooks for its coffee houses, galleries, antique and interior design shops, a music store selling curiosities such as Austrian mouth harps, and where many building remain decked with 1940s fittings straight out of a post-war film noir.

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