women

Inflammation is more than just the current health buzzword – it’s the factor scientists are pointing to as the potential root of most diseases.

What do cancer, heart disease, strokes, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia, obesity, depression and arthritis have in common? Aside from being chronic illnesses, these diseases are being grouped together by scientists who believe chronic inflammation is the single biggest contributing factor to each of them.

Description: Inflammation is more than just the current health buzzword – it’s the factor scientists are pointing to as the potential root of most diseases.

Inflammation is more than just the current health buzzword – it’s the factor scientists are pointing to as the potential root of most diseases.

This news, researched and backed up in study after study. is particularly interesting in that it’s only relatively recently that the medical fraternity has come to show that inflammation — a part of the body’s natural defence system — can go rogue and turn this defence into an attack, and to accept that this is potentially the root of all degenerative diseases.

When the good things turns bad

If you’ve ever burnt yourself while pulling dinner out of the oven, you’ll know exactly what inflammation is — it’s the bright red mark that immediately pops up, and the blister that follows. It’s the purple bruise after a knock, the swelling after a twisted ankle, or the red heat around an infected tooth. Essentially, it’s the body’s built-in first-aid response to an injury, to prevent further infection and assist the body’s repair processes.

This acute inflammatory response — where the body identifies which cells are damaged and require repair — switches on when it’s needed and then retreats when it’s not. But when it doesn’t retreat, pro-inflammatory cells continue to be stimulated, eventually becoming highly destructive, resulting in chronic inflammation.

When this state continues, it can lead to the expression of genes that can trigger major diseases — primarily coronary artery disease and cancer.

How does the switch from acute to chronic occur?

Chronic inflammation can occur in two ways: either because of repeated exposure to an offender such as Candida — in which case the body never gets a rest from the acute inflammation phase — or because it’s triggered by cellular stress and dysfunction caused by diet and environmental factors. Once chronic inflammation settles in and spreads, it can result in metabolic collapse, resulting in long-term damage.

Description: Once chronic inflammation settles in and spreads, it can result in metabolic collapse, resulting in long-term damage.

Once chronic inflammation settles in and spreads, it can result in metabolic collapse, resulting in long-term damage.

This cellular stress is essentially a breakdown in communication between your body’s innate immune system (what you’re born with) and your acquired immune system (which develops according to the environment, toxins or allergens you’re exposed to).

How do i know if I have it?

In contrast to acute inflammation, which makes itself felt, chronic inflammation is more insidious in that it often falls just below the point at which you’d clearly identify it as ‘pain’. Because of this, chronic inflammation is sometimes referred to as ‘silent’ inflammation.

However, there are some signs to look out for: general congestion and stuffiness, body aches and pains, lethargy, digestive troubles such as indigestion, stiffness or swelling around joints, shortness of breath, poor complexion or acne, and weight gain. These, of course, can also be symptoms of myriad other problems, which further complicates matters when trying to get a diagnosis, and because they might be vague, test results might not show anything out of the ordinary.

Description: Because of this, chronic inflammation is sometimes referred to as ‘silent’ inflammation.

Because of this, chronic inflammation is sometimes referred to as ‘silent’ inflammation.

If you feel that you’ve been suffering from these symptoms, or have had an unexplained few years of ‘just not feeling well’, the first test to ask your doctor about is the C Reactive Protein (CRP) test. When the innate and acquire immune systems communicate with one another through a series of biochemical reactions, they turn the inflammatory response on and off. But if this response isn’t turned off, this test will show an increase in CRP. even if there’s no obvious reason for that inflammatory response to have been activated. Incidentally, CRP is also used to assess your risk of heart disease and stroke.

What damage does it cause?

‘If you have inflammation you cannot be well,’ says Dr Barry Sears, author of The Anti-lnfla,wnation Zone. This is because the pro-inflammatory immune cells can damage healthy, functioning parts of our body, such  as pancreatic tissue (potentially resulting in diabetes) or joint tissue (leading to arthritis).

Description: ‘If you have inflammation you cannot be well,’ says Dr Barry Sears

‘If you have inflammation you cannot be well,’ says Dr Barry Sears

In addition, chronic inflammation also compromises the immune system by overworking it, and once this occurs, all forms of chronic illnesses can occur, even those which don’t necessarily exhibit pro-inflammatory markers such as CRP.

Who is most at risk?

There are a number of groups who are at a greater risk of their body’s inflammatory response not shutting off when it’s no longer required. Older adults form the biggest of these groups — it’s believed the older you are, the higher the chance that you have consistently raised levels of inflammatory markers. And while it’s not yet fully understood why, perimenopausal and menopausal women are believed to be most at risk, which could go some way to understanding why women are more likely than men to have an auto- immune disease.

Obesity is thought to be another risk factor, as are low sex hormones, which help modulate the inflammatory response and which decrease after menopause. and a diet high in saturate fat.

Top search
women
- 6 Ways To Have a Natural Miscarriage
- Foods That Cause Miscarriage
- Losing Weight In A Week With Honey
- Can You Eat Crab Meat During Pregnancy?
- Grape Is Pregnant Women’s Friend
- 4 Kinds Of Fruit That Can Increase Risk Of Miscarriage
- Some Drinks Pregnant Women Should Say No With
- Signs Proving You Have Boy Pregnancy
- Why Do Pregnant Women Have Stomachache When Eating?
- Top Foods That Pregnant Women Should Be Careful Of
- 6 Kinds Of Vegetable That Increase Risk Of Miscarriage
Other
women
- Good, Better Breasts?
- Directions to Paradise
- Awaken To The Power Of Your Thoughts
- Pregnancy : Coping with Pregnancy Symptoms - Easing morning sickness
- Pregnancy : Traveling During Pregnancy, Dealing with Sleep Problems, Ideal Exercise
- Pregnancy : Your Pregnancy-at-work Toolkit, Hazards at Work
- Pregnancy : Your Pregnancy Handbag, Maternity Rights and Benefits
- Pregnancy : Perfect Pregnancy Snacks
- When The Big C Hits Small Fry (Part 4) - Coping strategies
- When The Big C Hits Small Fry (Part 3) - Wilm's tumour,Retino blastoma
 
women
Top keywords
women
Miscarriage Pregnant Pregnancy Pregnancy day by day Pregnancy week by week Losing Weight Stress Placenta Makeup Collection
Women
Top 5
women
- Cinnamon: A natural treatment for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?
- 5 Tips for Safe Exercise During Pregnancy
- Four Natural Ways Alternative Medicine Can Help You Get Pregnant (part 2)
- Four Natural Ways Alternative Medicine Can Help You Get Pregnant (part 1)
- Is Your Mental Health Causing You to Gain Weight (part 2) - Bipolar Disorder Associated with Weight Gain