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Your Pregnancy After 35 : Your Career and Your Pregnancy (part 4) - Driving during Pregnancy

- 7 Kinds Of Fruit That Pregnant Women Shouldn’t Eat
- How to have natural miscarriage
- Foods That Cause Miscarriage
- Signs Proving You Have Boy Pregnancy

Army Policies

During pregnancy, you are exempt from body composition and fitness testing. You cannot be deployed overseas. At 20 weeks, you are required to stand at parade rest or attention for no longer than 15 minutes. At 28 weeks, your work week is limited to 40 hours a week, 8 hours a day.

Navy Policies

During pregnancy, you are exempt from body composition and fitness testing. You are not allowed to serve on a ship after 20 weeks of pregnancy. You are limited to serving duty in places within 6 hours of medical care. Your work week is limited to 40 hours, and you are required to stand at parade rest or attention for no longer than 20 minutes.

Air Force Policies

During pregnancy, you are exempt from body composition and fitness testing. Restrictions are based on your work environment. If you are assigned to an area without obstetrical care, your assignment will be curtailed by week 24.

Marine Corps Policies

You will be on full-duty status until a medical doctor certifies full duty is not medically advised. You may not participate in contingency operations nor may you be deployed aboard a Navy vessel. Flight personnel are grounded unless cleared by a medical waiver. If a medical doctor deems you are unfit for physical training or you cannot stand in formation, you will be excused from these activities. However, you will remain available for worldwide assignments.

Pregnant Marines will not be detached from Hawaii aboard a ship after their sixth month. If serving aboard a ship, a pregnant woman will be reassigned at the first opportunity but no later than by 20 weeks.

U.S. Coast Guard

During pregnancy, you are exempt from body composition and fitness testing. After 28 weeks of pregnancy, your work week will be limited to 40 hours. You will not be assigned overseas. Other duty restrictions are based on your job; however, you will not be assigned to any rescue-swimmer duties during your pregnancy.

You may not be deployed from the twentieth week of your pregnancy through 6 months postpartum. You will not be assigned to any flight duties after your second trimester (26 weeks), and you are limited to serving duty in places within 3 hours of medical care.

Some General Cautions if You’re in the Military

We know women who get pregnant while on active duty face many challenges. The pressure to meet military body-weight standards could have an effect on your health; that’s the reason these requirements are relaxed during pregnancy.

Work hard to eat healthy foods so your iron stores and folic-acid levels are adequate. Examine your job for any hazards you may be exposed to, such as standing for long periods, heavy lifting and exposure to toxic chemicals. Before receiving any vaccinations or inoculations, discuss them with your pregnancy doctor. Any of these factors can impact your pregnancy.

If you are concerned about any of the above, discuss it with a superior. Changes beyond those described above may have to be made.

Driving during Pregnancy

It is usually safe to drive during pregnancy, but it may become uncomfortable for you to get in and out of the car as pregnancy progresses. However, your increasing size shouldn’t interfere with your ability to drive.

Many women are confused about whether they should wear seat belts and shoulder harnesses during pregnancy. These safety restraints are just as necessary during pregnancy as they are when you’re not pregnant!

For your protection, and the protection of your developing baby, always wear your safety belt/shoulder harness when driving or riding in a car! There is no evidence that use of safety restraints increases the chance of fetal or uterine injury. You have a better chance of survival in an accident wearing a seat belt than not wearing one.

There is a correct way to wear your safety belt during pregnancy. Place the lap-belt part of the restraint under your abdomen and across your upper thighs so it’s snug but comfortable. Adjust your sitting position so the belt crosses your shoulder without cutting into your neck. Position the shoulder harness between your breasts; don’t slip it off your shoulder. The lap belt can’t hold you safely by itself.

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