women

Sleep deprivation can have long-term health, social and spiritual repercussions-but yoga has the power to help you reclaim your

Each night, in an effort to coax my one year old to sleep, I whisper this old nursery rhyme: "Early to bed and early to rise makes a person healthy, wealthy and wise". My daughter will suck her thumb, close her eyes and settle in for a deep slumber. I, on the other hand, tiptoe into the next room, turn on my computer and start work for the day.

My sleep cycle has changed dramatically since giving birth. Before, I would wake early most mornings and head to the yoga studio for a dynamic two-hour asana practice. In the evenings, I'd be in bed asleep by 10.30 p.m. I was fit, energetic and easily able to cope with the competing demands of work, friends and family.

My sleep cycle has changed dramatically since giving birth.

My sleep cycle has changed dramatically since giving birth.

These days, I'm lucky to be in bed before i a.m. and still asleep at 6 a.m. I've started drinking coffee and rely on the caffeine to lift the veil of tiredness that covers me most mornings. My eyes are bloodshot, my memory jumbled and my energy reserves consistently low. The lack of sleep is starting to show

Of course, I'm not alone. Most new parents experience some form of sleep deprivation. High-powered executives are susceptible, as are shift workers, the elderly and adolescents, who often struggle to balance schoolwork with social media. In fact, according to experts, in our fast-paced, work-centric, 24-hour world, most people's sleep is at risk.

Society of insomniacs

A recent report commissioned by the Sleep Health Foundation found that around 1.5 million Australian adults (around nine per cent of the population) have been diagnosed with a sleep disorder. Many thousands more go undiagnosed.

"Insomnia is on the rise," says Marc Cohen, professor of Health Sciences at RMIT University. "More than 80 per cent of the population will have a sleeping problem at some stage in their lives."

"More than 80 per cent of the population will have a sleeping problem at some stage in their lives."

Over time, chronic partial sleep deprivation can cause a raft of health problems including low immunity, poor digestion, low sex drive, hormonal imbalance, obesity, addiction and depression. It's also often a contributing factor in workplace injuries and can impede our ability to tune in to our spiritual selves.

Stress heads

Medical-based sleeping disorders aside, "The most common sleep disturbance is either difficulty initiating sleep or difficultly maintaining sleep," says Moira Junge, a health psychologist specializing in sleep disorders and spokesperson for the Australasian Sleep Association.

In most cases, stress and anxiety are at the root of the problem. Lifestyle and diet also play an important part. "We're very confused, we're very time-poor, we're very stressed out and don't know our place," says naturopath, herbalist and homeopath Anthia Koullouros of OVViO Organics.

"I see five to eight clients almost every day and have done so for 20 years. All I see are people who arc stressed out and fearful, with thoughts that keep them up at night and the inability to switch off their mind."

That said, not all yogic practices are appropriate for treating insomnia and, practiced at the wrong time, certain types of asana and pranayama can make things worse.

That said, not all yogic practices are appropriate for treating insomnia and, practiced at the wrong time, certain types of asana and pranayama can make things worse.

There's long been a culture of pharmacological intervention in Australia. "In around 2008-2009, our statistics were that more than 90 per cent of people presenting to a GP who mentioned a sleeping problem were prescribed a pill," says Junge. But that is changing as the body of evidence grows around non-pharmacological techniques such as yoga.

Recently, a clinical trial overseen by Professor Cohen found that yoga had a positive effect on reducing insomnia, and improving sleep and quality of life in the elderly. A 2009 study by the Australian Institute of Yoga Therapy and the Centre for Adult Education yielded similar results.

That said, not all yogic practices are appropriate for treating insomnia and, practiced at the wrong time, certain types of asana and pranayama can make things worse.

Top search
women
- 6 Ways To Have a Natural Miscarriage
- Foods That Cause Miscarriage
- Losing Weight In A Week With Honey
- Can You Eat Crab Meat During Pregnancy?
- Grape Is Pregnant Women’s Friend
- 4 Kinds Of Fruit That Can Increase Risk Of Miscarriage
- Some Drinks Pregnant Women Should Say No With
- Signs Proving You Have Boy Pregnancy
- Why Do Pregnant Women Have Stomachache When Eating?
- Top Foods That Pregnant Women Should Be Careful Of
- 6 Kinds Of Vegetable That Increase Risk Of Miscarriage
Other
women
- Pregnancy Week by Week : Week 22 (part 3)
- Pregnancy Week by Week : Week 22 (part 2)
- Pregnancy Week by Week : Week 22 (part 1) - What Is Anemia?
- How To Repulse Stress When Being Pregnant
- Fitting in Fitness (part 3) - Walking for Health, Kegel Exercises
- Fitting in Fitness (part 2) - Developing an Effective Exercise Plan
- Fitting in Fitness (part 1) - Benefits of Exercise During Pregnancy
- Efficient Supports That Can Help Pregnant Women Sleep Well (Part 2)
- Efficient Supports That Can Help Pregnant Women Sleep Well (Part 1)
- Eliminate Unpleasant Feeling In 9 Months Of Pregnancy
 
women
Top keywords
women
Miscarriage Pregnant Pregnancy Pregnancy day by day Pregnancy week by week Losing Weight Stress Placenta Makeup Collection
Women
Top 5
women
- Cinnamon: A natural treatment for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?
- 5 Tips for Safe Exercise During Pregnancy
- Four Natural Ways Alternative Medicine Can Help You Get Pregnant (part 2)
- Four Natural Ways Alternative Medicine Can Help You Get Pregnant (part 1)
- Is Your Mental Health Causing You to Gain Weight (part 2) - Bipolar Disorder Associated with Weight Gain