women

Red light on red meat

Eating red meat is associated with a higher risk of early death, a study found, particularly from cancer and heart disease. Researchers tracked the health and diet of more than 121,000 people from 1980 through 2006. For each extra 3-ounce serving of red meat per day, the participants’ risk of premature death increased 12 percent compared with those whose dieats contained less than half a serving of red meat per day. A daily serving of processed meats such as salami and bacon increased mortality risk by 20 percent. The researchers estimated that by substituting poultry, fish, nuts, legumes, low-fat dairy, or whole grains for a serving of red meat each day, study participants would have lowered their risk of premature death by 7 to 19 percent.

Description: Eating red meat is associated with a higher risk of early death

Eating red meat is associated with a higher risk of early death

Say fiber

Want a healthier smile? Have some fiber. Reseachers report that older men who eat more high-fiber foods, particularly fruits, showed fewer signs of gum disease than those who eat less. Each serving of high-fiber foods – those with at least 2.5 grams of fiber per serving – was associated with a 25 percent lower risk of jawbone erosion and tooth loss. The fiber intake may increase chewing and promote saliva production, which can thwart harmful bacteria in the mouth, the researchers say. To boost fiber intake, try adding more bananas, apples, pears, oranges, broccoli, lentils, beans, and oatmeal to your diet.

Description: Want a healthier smile? Have some fiber.

Want a healthier smile? Have some fiber.

News Brief – Label Makeover

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that raw meat labels will now carry additional nutritional information, including calories, total fat, and saturated fat. The new labels will be found on packages of ground meat, such as hamburger and ground turkey. Plus, 40 of the most popular cuts of raw whole meat, such as tenderloin steak and chicken breast, will also carry yhe extra nutritional information, either on the packaging or on a display in the store.

Description: The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that raw meat labels will now carry additional nutritional information, including calories, total fat, and saturated fat.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that raw meat labels will now carry additional nutritional information, including calories, total fat, and saturated fat.

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